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Wednesday, December 05, 2018

Mission Complete: As a nation mourns George H.W. Bush, his dog Sully transitions to new service

We at the Humane Society Legislative Fund were saddened by the passing of George H.W. Bush, our nation’s 41st president, and we’re thankful for his extraordinary service to the United States. In this remarkable week of national mourning and celebration, it was naturally and deeply moving for us to see public fascination fix so heavily on a photograph of the late president’s service dog Sully, at the watch, in front of the casket. This image is destined to become an iconic remembrance of the late president’s loyalty and faithfulness as a public servant.

Sully-blog
Sully keeping vigil by late President George H. W.
Bush’s casket.

And that’s as it should be. For many years, the pets kept by members of the Bush family have been in the national spotlight. Barbara Bush’s dog Millie was the “author” of a children’s book that described a day in the life of the Bush family in the White House, complete with briefings, Oval Office deliberations, and other activities. And just two years ago, the second President Bush, George W., with his wife Laura, adopted a dog from the SPCA of Texas, showing their public support for adoption as the best option.

It gave us satisfaction to learn that Sully will now transition to further service at Walter Reed Army Hospital, where his special talents and personal characteristics can now benefit still more veterans. We’re sure that this would have pleased the late president, who knew combat at first hand, who understood the gravity of our sending men and women into battle, and who had the strongest possible commitment to those who serve.

In recent years, we’ve supported several congressional bills to further the training and placement of service dogs with veterans. These bills have generally sought to establish a grants program to support the work of non-governmental organizations involved in training and providing dogs for pairing with individual veterans suffering from PTSD and other conditions. One of the measures advanced calls for a Veterans Administration pilot program to evaluate the effectiveness of service dog programs serving military veterans, at five VA medical centers.

We’ve also seen some allocations for training of dogs within FY18 and FY19 appropriations. The FY18 Omnibus package included $10 million for Therapeutic Service Dog Training within the Department of Defense Wounded Warrior Service Dog Program that awards grants to nonprofits providing therapeutic service dogs to veterans and active duty personnel facing physical injuries and emotional scars from their military service, including post-traumatic stress disorder, traumatic brain injury, blindness, loss of limb, and paralysis. The package also provided $1 million increase for Equine-Assisted Therapy under the Veterans Affairs’ Adaptive Sports grant program for veterans suffering from mental health issues including PTSD.

With respect to FY19 Appropriations, Congress continued to show its support, providing another $10 million for FY19 for the Wounded Warrior Service Dog program. With respect to Equine Therapy, Congress further directed the VA to allocate $1.5 million of the Adaptive Sports program funding to boost grants for the purpose of equine therapy targeted to mental health issues

When it comes to bringing veterans and animals together, we’re for it, emphatically, and we hope and expect to support such legislation in the new congress. We’d like to see officials consolidate approaches to this topic, on a thoughtful and strong bi-partisan basis, because we think this would strengthen chances of action.

We believe the need for such programs is great. And what a tribute it would be to the memory of the late president were the Congress to approve and implement more such legislation in the next session.

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